Hymns to Pusan from the Rig-Veda - Book I

Brahma receiving the Vedas

Translation by Ralph T.H. Griffith

HYMN XLII. Pusan.

I SHORTEN our ways, O Pusan, move aside obstruction in the path:
Go close before us, cloud-born God.
2 Drive, Pusan, from our road the wolf, the wicked inauspicious wolf,
Who lies in Wait to injure us.
3 Who lurks about the path we take, the robber with a guileful heart:
Far from the road chase him away.
4 Tread with thy foot and trample out the firebrand of the wicked one,
The double-tongued, whoe'er he be.
5 Wise Pusan, Wonder-Worker, we claim of thee now the aid wherewith
Thou furtheredst our sires of old.
6 So, Lord of all prosperity, best wielder of the golden sword,
Make riches easy to be won.
7 Past all pursuers lead us, make pleasant our path and fair to tread:
O Pusan, find thou power for this.
8 Lead us to meadows rich in grass: send on our way no early heat:
O Pusan, find thou power for this.
9 Be gracious to us, fill us full, give, feed us, and invigorate:
O Pusan, find thou power for this.
10 No blame have we for Pusan; him we magnify with songs of praise:
We seek the Mighty One for wealth.


HYMN CXXXVIII. Pusan.

1. STRONG Pusan's majesty is lauded evermore, the glory of his lordly might is never faint, his song of praise is never faint.
Seeking felicity I laud him nigh to help, the source, of bliss,
Who, Vigorous one, hath drawn to him the hearts of all, drawn them, the Vigorous One, the God.
2 Thee, then, O Pusan, like a swift one on his way, I urge with lauds that thou mayst make the foemen flee, drive, camel-like, our foes afar.
As I, a man, call thee, a God, giver of bliss, to be my Friend,
So make our loudly-chanted praises glorious, in battles make them glorious.
3 Thou, Pusan, in whose friendship they who sing forth praise enjoy advantage, even in wisdom, through thy grace, in wisdom even they are advanced.
So, after this most recent course, we come to thee with prayers for wealth.
Not stirred to anger, O Wide-Ruler, come to us, come thou to us in every fight.
4 Not stirred to anger, come, Free-giver, nigh to us, to take this gift of ours, thou who hast goats for steeds, Goat-borne! their gift who long for fame.
So, Wonder-Worker! may we turn thee hither with effectual lauds.
I slight thee not, O Pusan, thou Resplendent One: thy friendship may not be despised.

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Source: An English translation of the Vedas by Ralph T.H. Griffith, 1896.