Historical Events, Birthdays And Quotations

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This Day in History

 

Tue, 27 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

Carbon-14 Discovered (1940)

Tue, 27 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

Carbon-14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon having a mass number of 14 and a half-life of approximately 5,700 years. It occurs naturally, arising from cosmic rays, and is used as a tracer in studies of metabolism and in radiocarbon dating—a method of determining the age of carbonaceous, once-living material. Carbon-14 was discovered by Martin Kamen and Sam Ruben at the University of California Radiation Laboratory, but its existence had been predicted six years earlier by whom? Discuss


The February 26 Incident (1936)

Mon, 26 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

The February 26 Incident was an attempted military coup in Japan launched by a radical faction of the Imperial Japanese Army that sought to stamp out corruption and poverty in rural Japan by assassinating certain elder statesmen. Before the coup was suppressed, the rebels managed to briefly occupy the center of Tokyo and kill several leading politicians, including the finance minister. The prime minister, however, survived thanks to a case of mistaken identity. Who was killed in his place?


First Pan American Games Are Held in Buenos Aires, Argentina (1951)

Sun, 25 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

The Pan American Games is a multi-sport event open to competitors from all nations of the Western Hemisphere. Patterned after the Olympic Games and sanctioned by the International Olympic Committee, the games are held every four years in the year preceding the Summer Olympic Games. Argentina took home more medals than any other country in the first Pan American Games, however, the US has since become the overall medal leader, with a current total of 3,915. Who lights the Pan American torch?



Word Trivia

 

Tue, 27 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

vomit

Tue, 27 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

brash - A euphemism for vomit. More...

retch, wretch - Retch is the verb to vomit or gag; wretch is a noun for a pitiable person. More...

spew - First meant "vomit." More...

vomit - From Latin vomere. More...


ranch

Mon, 26 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

biscuit shooter - A waitress at a lunch counter or a cook on a ranch. More...

dude, dude ranch - A dude is a city-dweller, especially one vacationing on a ranch—hence, dude ranch. More...

ranch dressing - A creamy buttermilk-based dressing with garlic and other spices and herbs, developed at Hidden Valley Ranch in Santa Barbara in the 1950s. More...

ranch - From Spanish rancho, "group of persons eating together." More...


twigs

Sun, 25 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

drey - A squirrel's nest of twigs in a tree. More...

broom - Was first called a besom, but evolved because many of them were made of twigs from the wild broom shrub. More...

lop - The smaller branches and twigs of a tree. More...

whiskers - Originally the word for a bundle of feathers, twigs, etc. used for whisking (from "whisk"), it then came to denote the projecting hairs or bristles of mammals. More...



Today's Birthdays

 

Tue, 27 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

John Steinbeck (1902)

Tue, 27 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

Steinbeck was an American writer perhaps best remembered for his strong, Pulitzer Prize-winning sociological novel The Grapes of Wrath, which is widely considered one of the great American novels of the 20th century. His later novels include Cannery Row, The Pearl, and East of Eden. He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962. One of Steinbeck's last works was Travels with Charley, a travelogue about a road trip across America. Who was Charley? Discuss


Victor-Marie Hugo (1802)

Mon, 26 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

Hugo was a French poet, dramatist, and novelist. The son of a general, he was an accomplished poet before age 20. With his verse drama Cromwell in 1827, he emerged as an important figure in Romanticism. His best-known novels are The Hunchback of Notre Dame, an evocation of medieval life, and Les Misérables, the story of the convict Jean Valjean. Their immense popularity made him the most successful writer in the world at that time. Why was Hugo forced into exile in 1851?


George Harrison (1943)

Sun, 25 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

Harrison was a British rock singer, guitarist, and songwriter, best known as a member of the Beatles from 1962 to 1970. Although John Lennon and Paul McCartney were the Beatles' main songwriters, Harrison, "the quiet Beatle," generally wrote or sang lead on a few songs per album. His later compositions included hits such as "Here Comes the Sun" and "Something." Harrison also penned "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," which features what guest musician on lead guitar?



Article of the Day

 

Tue, 27 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

The Space Pen

Tue, 27 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

Marketers of the Space Pen claim that the writing implement can be used in zero gravity, upside down, underwater, over wet paper, at any angle, and in extreme temperatures. The pen, which was invented by American industrialist Paul C. Fisher, uses pressurized ink cartridges to force thixotropic ink through its tungsten carbide ballpoint. Though standard ballpoint pens can be used in space, both the American and Russian space programs use Fisher's pen. Why is it dangerous to use pencils in space? Discuss


Dissociative Amnesia

Mon, 26 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

Dissociative amnesia is a loss of personal memory caused by a severe psychological trauma. Because the amnesia does not result from physiological trauma, such as a brain injury or disease, it is often treated with psychological therapy. While dissociative amnesia is often associated with particular events or periods of time, in its most radical form there is a total abandonment of personal identity and memory. How was "truth serum" used to treat dissociative amnesia during World War II?


Aron Ralston

Sun, 25 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

The 2004 book Between a Rock and a Hard Place chronicles the experiences of Aron Ralston, an American mountain climber who survived a nearly fatal hike in the Utah desert. While Ralston was canyoneering alone in May 2003, his right forearm became trapped by a falling boulder. Unable to lift the rock, Ralston was forced to amputate his own arm in order to free himself. How many days did Ralston wait before beginning the terrible operation?



Quotations of the Day

 

Tue, 27 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

John F. Kennedy

Tue, 27 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

Our progress as a nation can be no swifter than our progress in education. Discuss


John F. Kennedy

Mon, 26 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

The new and terrible dangers which man has created can only be controlled by man.


Washington Irving

Sun, 25 Feb 2024 05:00:00 GMT

A mother is the truest friend we have, when trials, heavy and sudden, fall upon us; when adversity takes the place of prosperity; when friends who rejoice with us in our sunshine, desert us when troubles thicken around us, still will she cling to us, and endeavor by her kind precepts and counsels to dissipate the clouds of darkness, and cause peace to return to our hearts.





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