Historical Events, Birthdays And Quotations

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This Day in History

 

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

The Creation of the Peace Symbol (1958)

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Historically, the idea of peace has been represented by symbols that attempt to transcend differences of culture, such as the white dove, the olive branch, and the broken rifle. The now-familiar line-drawing of a crow's foot in a circle was created specifically for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament by British artist Gerald Holtom, but it quickly caught on as a general, international sign for peace. Holtom has stated that it is derived from the semaphore flag signals for what two letters? Discuss


The Station Nightclub Fire (2003)

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Moments after the band Great White took the stage at the Station nightclub in Rhode Island, sparks from one of the group's pyrotechnic devices—of which the nightclub was unaware—ignited the highly flammable sound insulation around the stage. The nightclub, which had no sprinklers, was engulfed in minutes, trapping many inside. One hundred people were killed, making it one of the deadliest nightclub fires in US history. How many people faced criminal charges in the aftermath of the tragedy?


Former US Vice President Aaron Burr Arrested for Treason (1807)

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Nearly three years after killing Alexander Hamilton in a duel, former US Vice President Aaron Burr was arrested on unrelated charges of treason. Though the exact details of his plan were a mystery even then, he was accused of plotting to establish an independent country of his own, possibly in the American Southwest. He was treated well while imprisoned at Fort Stoddert and was eventually acquitted, but his political career was destroyed. Which of his co-conspirators turned on him?



In the News

 

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

In soil-dwelling bacteria, scientists find a new weapon to fight drug-resistant superbugs

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

It's a new class of antibiotic that promises to live up to its rough Latin translation: killer of bad guys. In a report published this week in the journal Nature Microbiology, researchers describe a never-before-seen antibiotic agent that vanquished ... Discuss


Mother suffering from rare disease wakes up with British accent

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

An Arizona mom says that two years ago, she had a headache, laid down and woke up with a British accent. She's had it ever since. KNXV reports that Michelle Myers isn't making it up, and something similar actually happened to her twice before. Experts ...


Broken heart syndrome: Could it happen to you?

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Can you die of a broken heart? Broken heart syndrome is not a term Hollywood made up, it's a real heart condition that's often brought on by stressful situations, like a heart-wrenching breakup or the death of a loved one.The syndrome, also known as takotsubo ...



Today's Birthdays

 

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Jeanne Calment (1875)

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

At the age of 100, Calment was still riding a bicycle around her native Arles, France. She lived on her own until she was 110 and smoked until she was 117. She saw the Eiffel Tower being built and remembered selling colored pencils to Vincent van Gogh as a girl in her family's shop. By the time she died in 1997 at the age of 122, Calment had lived the longest confirmed human life in history—and outlived her entire family. What foods have been cited as contributing to Calment's longevity? Discuss


Tony Wilson (1950)

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Beginning in the late 1970s, the English city of Manchester became the epicenter of a vibrant music scene that produced such seminal bands as Joy Division, Happy Mondays, and the Stone Roses. One of the key people behind the Manchester scene was Wilson, a record label owner, club manager, and journalist. The 2002 film 24 Hour Party People is based on his life. Despite his widespread influence, he made little money from his work and was unable to pay for what expensive medical treatment?


Shivaji (1630)

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

A devout Hindu, Shivaji grew up hating the Mughal Empire that controlled most of his native India. Around 1655, he began making guerrilla attacks on the Muslim kingdom of Bijapur, gradually carving out his own domain. He lured the Bijapur army to its destruction, becoming a formidable warlord overnight by taking the army's equipment. He then established the Maratha Empire, which was noted for its religious tolerance. How did he once make a daring escape from the Mughal emperor's palace?



Article of the Day

 

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Secondhand Smoke

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Secondhand smoke is cigarette, cigar, or pipe smoke that is inhaled unintentionally by nonsmokers. The amount of such smoke inhaled by a nonsmoker is relatively small when compared to the amount inhaled by a tobacco user; however, so-called passive smoking can aggravate respiratory illnesses and contribute to serious diseases, including cancer. This danger has led many countries to adopt smoking bans in indoor spaces. How has the tobacco industry responded to the issue of secondhand smoke? Discuss


The Invention of the Potter's Wheel

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

It is not known when the potter's wheel first came into use, but experts suggest it was developed between about 6,000 BCE and 2,400 BCE. Many modern scholars suggest that it was first developed in Mesopotamia, although Egypt and China are also possible places of origin. The device enables potters to utilize the energy stored in the wheel and direct it specifically to the point of contact between the clay and hands. What term is used to refer to the forming of a vessel on a potter's wheel?


Father of the Deaf

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Charles-Michel de l'Épée was born to a wealthy French family in 1712. He trained to be a Catholic priest but was denied ordination and went on to study law before returning to the Church. A chance encounter with two deaf sisters who communicated using a signed language inspired Épée to dedicate himself to the education and salvation of the deaf. In the 1750s, he founded a shelter that eventually became the world's first free school for the deaf. What are some criticisms of his signing system?



Quotations of the Day

 

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Gilbert Chesterton

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Silver is sometimes more valuable than gold ... that is, in large quantities. Discuss


Lucy Maud Montgomery

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Long ago, before I had ever seen a diamond, I read about them and I tried to imagine what they would be like ... When I saw a real diamond in a lady's ring one day I was so disappointed I cried. Of course, it was very lovely but it wasn't my idea of a diamond.


Ambrose Bierce

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 05:00:00 GMT

Birth, n.: The first and direst of all disasters.




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